agencies in mumbai

direct marketing, advertising, and the law

In the UK there are strict laws protecting consumers, and to a different extent businesses, from aspects of direct marketing and other forms of advertising. Other countries generally have their own equivalent laws.

Consumers and to some degree businesses can ‘opt out’ of being subjected to various sorts of direct marketing activities. In the UK this system of opting out is managed via the processes and organisation of ‘Preference Services’. When you use direct marketing – whatever the method – ensure you are acting within the law, and have consulted the relevant Preference Service rules (or local country equivalent).

Separately, the Data Protection Act in the UK contains implications for storing list data and using certain lists, notably for private consumers, and for the marketing of particular services (for example financial services), and there are similar laws dealing with this aspect in different countries, so check the law as applicable for your own situation before buying and using lists. More details (for the UK) about Data Protection rules are at the Information Commissioner’s Office. You should adhere to your local laws or guidelines concerning unsolicited direct marketing. In the UK these are explained by the Information Commissioner’s Office in terms of direct marketing by phone, electronic or postal methods. If you are not in the UK seek equivalent advice.

And aside from this, advertising is subject to scrutiny and action by the Advertising Standards Authority (UK), and of course all advertising and marketing is ultimately accountable to the various laws which seek to protect people and organisations from illicit or fraudulent trading.

For more information about good and acceptable practices in advertising (and by implication marketing too) refer to the UK Advertising Standards Authority, and the the European European Advertising Standards Alliance (EASA), which represents European national self-regulatory and representative organisations for the advertising industry in Europe.

Whether you are marketing to private consumers or to businesses and other large organizations be fair and reasonable.

Certain practices may technically be within the law, but are not ethical or generally acceptable, so don’t use them.

Think about what sorts of direct advertising (especially telephoning, texting, emailing) annoys you as a customer or consumer. If something annoys you, then it will annoy other people, and you would be wise not to use such methods.

It is bad business to gain a new customer at the cost of inconveniencing or alienating other people.
It is bad business to gain a new customer at the cost of inconveniencing or alienating other people.
A particular example of bad business and bad marketing is making ‘cold’ telephone calls and pretending that the call is about a survey, or an ‘opportunity’ rather than being honest immediately about the purpose of your call. Avoid this cheap little trick. It will lose you more customers than it will win.
A particular example of bad business and bad marketing is making ‘cold’ telephone calls and pretending that the call is about a survey, or an ‘opportunity’ rather than being honest immediately about the purpose of your call. Avoid this cheap little trick. It will lose you more customers than it will win.

Also avoid the highly discourteous practice of leaving messages on somebody’s answerphone or voicemail, asking for a call back, by only stating your name and number. Sales organizations who use this tactic are unethical and fundamentally fearful that what they are trying to sell is not good.

There is no law against marketing using the above two tactics, but they are cheap and nasty, annoying and timewasting and inconvenient; potential customers will respond negatively. So don’t use such methods.

There are plenty of positive effective perfectly ethical ways to engage potential customers in sales discussions. There is no need to resort to anything els

It is bad business to gain a new customer at the cost of inconveniencing or alienating other people.

Whether you are marketing to private consumers or to businesses and other large organizations be fair and reasonable.

Certain practices may technically be within the law, but are not ethical or generally acceptable, so don’t use them.

Think about what sorts of direct advertising (especially telephoning, texting, emailing) annoys you as a customer or consumer. If something annoys you, then it will annoy other people, and you would be wise not to use such methods.

Also avoid the highly discourteous practice of leaving messages on somebody’s answerphone or voicemail, asking for a call back, by only stating your name and number. Sales organizations who use this tactic are unethical and fundamentally fearful that what they are trying to sell is not good.

There is no law against marketing using the above two tactics, but they are cheap and nasty, annoying and timewasting and inconvenient; potential customers will respond negatively. So don’t use such methods.

There are plenty of positive effective perfectly ethical ways to engage potential customers in sales discussions. There is no need to resort to anything els

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