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‘door to door’ leaflets and advertising distribution

Large quantity leaflet drops to consumer households and business addresses, without the need for envelopes or normal postal charges, can usually be arranged through the postal services (the Post Office in the UK), so that your leaflet is delivered at the same time as the normal post, or at other times of the day if required. Demographic targeting, based on postcodes and population census data, is possible to a degree, and the cost is often inclusive in the distribution charges.

Other specialised household distributors provide similar services, sometimes incorporated within local newspaper deliveries.

Details can be obtained from various door-to-door distribution services providers, and the UK Direct Marketing Association.

If you are starting a business serving your local area, door-to-door leaflets (or other advertising materials, especially those designed to generate a direct response) remain one of the most productive and cost-effective ways to reach customers and to generate new sales.

Some people start a new business and sit waiting in their office or manufacturing unit for customers to appear, as if by magic. They will not appear. If you ever find yourself sitting waiting in your office for customers to appear, or ‘busying yourself’ doing some more planning or brainstorming, or messing around with your computer settings, stop what you are doing, and instead go out and deliver some advertising leaflets into people’s letterboxes. This will help to make customers appear.

As a very rough rule:

if you have a good, simple, relatively low-cost quick-decision sales proposition
and you have designed a leaflet which conveys the proposition effectively,
then (very roughly) every 100 leaflets you deliver (to your appropriate target market) should produce a new customer.

So, imagine – every couple of hours you sit doing nothing, or something unimportant, in your office, you could instead deliver a hundred leaflets, and produce a new customer.
So, imagine – every couple of hours you sit doing nothing, or something unimportant, in your office, you could instead deliver a hundred leaflets, and produce a new customer.
posters sites (hoardings, taxi-cabs, buses, roadside fields)
posters sites (hoardings, taxi-cabs, buses, roadside fields)

For advertising considered as public information a variety of poster sites are free to the advertiser, so it makes sense to use these freely, supported by some record system so you keep them up-to-date and utilised. Other sites vary according to nature and cost, from large roadside hoardings to buses, taxis and sports grounds. Anywhere that people pass or gather in large numbers is a potential poster site, and as with printed media, audience profile information is usually available. New sites are being discovered and exploited all the time, such as supermarket trolleys and floors, table napkins, public conveniences, and the media extends now into continuous video at post offices and filling stations forecourts, etc.

For some while it has been possible to produce sales literature and brochures in user-friendly (commonly interactive) digital format. Progressively ever more ‘feature-richness’ can be incorporated into user experience when accessing marketing information.

Early sophistication of website design enabled user ‘interaction’; this has now made way for ‘virtual’ experiences. Such design was initially (around the turn of the 20th century) very expensive, but given that the cost of online technology and design tends always to reduce quite steadily and quickly, by the end of the first decade of the 21st century even very modest websites could realistically feature the sort of design and user experience that was the stuff of science-fiction fantasy a generation ago.

So, imagine – every couple of hours you sit doing nothing, or something unimportant, in your office, you could instead deliver a hundred leaflets, and produce a new customer.

Social networking websites (Facebook and Twitter from around 2010 notably) have now become immensely significant in the publicity and marketing of products and services and corporations, and also in the management of customer relationships, reputation, image, and especially positive and negative reviews/opinions.

And as more agencies, technology companies and digital media organisations develop their offerings and technologies, so the costs and time of design, origination, production and implementation will reduce to levels that will shift the big majority of marketing communications away from traditional (printed and other non-digital) media into modern electronic and online media, digital information, and online ‘engagement’ between customers and suppliers of all sorts.

Internet advertising has advanced fantastically beyond the early days of simple trade listings, internet directories, and ‘pay-per-click’ advertising offered by the major search engines. Such sophisticated methods are now easily available, very viable, and extremely relevant for very small ‘local’ businesses, and are all examples of this fundamental shift in marketing.

In response to the online revolution, conventional printed sales and marketing materials of all types (from newspapers and magazines, to brochures and business cards) are becoming largely obsolete, as customers look to the internet (via phones, pc’s, laptops, PDA’s and in the future TV too) for quick, up-to-the-minute information about products, services and suppliers of all sorts.

Most, if not all of the information you need is freely available on the internet – take time to look for it and learn – and ensure that your business explores and implements the many very cost-effective advertising methods available to you via internet media and the modern digital revolution.

Take time to learn about and understand which of the new digital methods will work for you and how. You will be experiencing already many of these methods as a customer on the web. Think about how it works while you are a customer, and ask yourself how you might make use of these incredible methods instead for yourself as a supplier.

As a very rough rule:

if you have a good, simple, relatively low-cost quick-decision sales proposition
and you have designed a leaflet which conveys the proposition effectively,
then (very roughly) every 100 leaflets you deliver (to your appropriate target market) should produce a new customer.

For advertising considered as public information a variety of poster sites are free to the advertiser, so it makes sense to use these freely, supported by some record system so you keep them up-to-date and utilised. Other sites vary according to nature and cost, from large roadside hoardings to buses, taxis and sports grounds. Anywhere that people pass or gather in large numbers is a potential poster site, and as with printed media, audience profile information is usually available. New sites are being discovered and exploited all the time, such as supermarket trolleys and floors, table napkins, public conveniences, and the media extends now into continuous video at post offices and filling stations forecourts, etc.

For some while it has been possible to produce sales literature and brochures in user-friendly (commonly interactive) digital format. Progressively ever more ‘feature-richness’ can be incorporated into user experience when accessing marketing information.

Early sophistication of website design enabled user ‘interaction’; this has now made way for ‘virtual’ experiences. Such design was initially (around the turn of the 20th century) very expensive, but given that the cost of online technology and design tends always to reduce quite steadily and quickly, by the end of the first decade of the 21st century even very modest websites could realistically feature the sort of design and user experience that was the stuff of science-fiction fantasy a generation ago.

Social networking websites (Facebook and Twitter from around 2010 notably) have now become immensely significant in the publicity and marketing of products and services and corporations, and also in the management of customer relationships, reputation, image, and especially positive and negative reviews/opinions.

And as more agencies, technology companies and digital media organisations develop their offerings and technologies, so the costs and time of design, origination, production and implementation will reduce to levels that will shift the big majority of marketing communications away from traditional (printed and other non-digital) media into modern electronic and online media, digital information, and online ‘engagement’ between customers and suppliers of all sorts.

Internet advertising has advanced fantastically beyond the early days of simple trade listings, internet directories, and ‘pay-per-click’ advertising offered by the major search engines. Such sophisticated methods are now easily available, very viable, and extremely relevant for very small ‘local’ businesses, and are all examples of this fundamental shift in marketing.

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